1. Randyll Tarly's words still haunt Sam (noticed by BobThePineapple)

undefined

Before he and his poorly-named son were burning alive in the name of being loyal to the incestuous church-bombing queen, Randyll Tarly was busy grousing about his least-favorite son, Samwell. To say Samwell was a disappointment would be the understatement of the year - Randyll literally told him to leave home and join the Night's Watch immediately, or he would personally hunt him down and murder him. So when Samwell briefly visited home on his way to Oldtown (with the hopes of finding a good place for Gilly to stay and raise her child), Randyll was LESS THAN PLEASED to see his wayward son return, and spat at him that he spent his days "reading about the achievements of better men" and probably still couldn't ride a horse or swing a sword.

Of course, Randyll wasn't exactly right...but he wasn't entirely wrong either. Samwell, at the time, was leaving the fight happening in the North to go to Oldtown and studying to become a maester of the Citadel. He wasn't fighting or doing grand acts of bravery - he was going to be reading books again. And as his time in the Citadel went on, he found he was mostly reading books (and cleaning up feces and curing seemingly incurable diseases) while the Archmaester ignored all of his ideas and suggestions. Sam's weary reply to Gilly as to why they were leaving Oldtown was Sam bitterly echoing his father's words: "I'm tired of reading about the achievements of better men."

Although, uh, it WOULD be nice for you to put down the book and LISTEN TO YOUR GIRLFRIEND, SAM.



2. The show long ago revealed how Jorah and Thoros knew each other (noticed by Ser_Duncan_The_Ample)

undefined

undefined

undefined

The ranging party at Eastwatch was full of strange reunions and meetings - Gendry angry to see Beric Dondarrion and Thoros (who sold him to Melisandre), Jon recognizing the Hound from the first episode, and Jorah seeing ol' Thoros of Myr. And for those of you who did not read the books or pay TOO much attention to the brief asides in the show, you might not know exactly how Jorah Mormont and Thoros of Myr would know each other.

Years before the start of the series, Balon Greyjoy and his brothers rebelled against the Iron Throne in what was known as the Greyjoy Rebellion. It was short-lived - ending after the forces of Westeros stormed Pyke and put a quick end to it (and taking the lives of all of Balon's sons, except Theon). Ned Stark, Jaime Lannister, and Barristan Selmy all fought at the battle - as did Jorah Mormont (pre-exile) and Thoros of Myr. And while not everyone remembers too much of the battle so many years later, everyone remembers one thing: Thoros running in first, flaming sword in hand.

undefined

undefined

undefined

And now, all these years later, they've run into each other again - Thoros now a resurrection-happy drunk priest, and Jorah a greyscale-cured dragon queen friend-zoner. Funny how life works.



3. There's a reason Arya was able to find Littlefinger's hiding place so quickly... (noticed by baystateprimate)

undefined

undefined

When Arya was searching Littlefinger's quarters to find that mysterious letter he was so keen about getting, she managed to PRETTY QUICKLY check to see if his mattress had a hole in it - at least, more quickly than most people would have checked for something like that. And, as it turns out, there's a good reason: Arya's VERY FAMILIAR with hiding things inside of mattresses.

Back in season 3, there was a brief period (literally, like, one scene) where Sansa and Tyrion were married to one another and holding a friendly rapport (before Sansa found out about the Red Wedding and went back into her patented Sullen Mode), and Sansa revealed an old trick Arya used to play on her: hide shit in her bed.

undefined

Yep - Arya used to shove poop in Sansa's bed ALL THE TIME. No wonder she's suspicious Sansa might not have her interests in mind.



4. Gendry couldn't have been more wrong about the relationship his and Jon Snow's fathers had (noticed by McGrath99)

undefined

Jon Snow and Gendry finally meeting is an interesting pairing, because it's not one you had really expected to happen at all, let alone carry any meaning with it. And yet both find a common link with the other - after all, they're both bastards to their fathers, who were as close as friends could be. Gendry even comments "Our fathers trusted each other, why shouldn't we?"

However, the audience knows better. Not only did their (true) fathers not trust each other, but Gendry's father killed Jon's father in the heat of battle - because Jon's true father was Rhaegar Targaryen.

undefined

Artwork by Michael Komarck

Of course, this isn't going to be the most important thing that comes of Jon finding out he's actually Rhaegar's (trueborn!) son, but it's an interesting wrinkle - Jon and Gendry's dads weren't pals, they were the bitterest of enemies.



5. Davos' fake name for Gendry might have more meaning than you thought (noticed by fifthpilgrim)

Interesting Details Fans Noticed In This Week's 'Game of Thrones'

As Davos and Gendry are preparing to sneak out of King's Landing, they're happened upon by some Lannister guards who were naturally a little suspicious of the two - luckily, Davos pulls a solid con, pretending to be a fermented crab seller (which apparently is a pre-pharmaceutical version of Viagra) working alongside his pal "Clovis." Granted, I don't know why he really thought it necessary to fake Gendry's name - it's not an uncommon name in Westeros, and (as far as the Lannisters know) Robert's bastard Gendry was killed years ago (it was actually Lommy that died, but Arya convinced them it was the bastard they were after). Anyways, that's besides the point - the ACTUAL point is the name he chose: "Clovis."

undefined

The name doesn't have any notable significance in Westeros, but in the real world it has a great deal of meaning that could be VERY applicable to Gendry in the near future - you see, "Clovis" is a name assigned to a pre-historic culture near modern day New Mexico, mostly notable for their production of "Clovis point" weaponry and tools. They were advanced for the time and place - worked from stone and ivory and even bone. So what does this have to do with Gendry? Well, Gendry's a blacksmith - a uniquely talented blacksmith - and Jon Snow just found a bunch of dragonglass that he needs fashioned into weapons ASAP. Yet, Jon Snow has no one we know of who can actually work the raw dragonglass into enough weapons to meaningfully arm the North against the White Walkers and their Army of the Dead...until now.

If you think Gendry's sudden reappearance on the show after being completely gone for 3 seasons is a bit jarring, that's because it is. There's not a GREAT reason for Davos to risk his life by sneaking into Flea Bottom to recruit Gendry to their cause, except that the plot requires SOMEONE to be able to turn the dragonglass into weapons. "Clovis" is likely a hint at that.

(*in a very quiet nerd voice*) ...and a good excuse for not making his fake name "Edric."