They say "practice makes perfect" - and as someone who practiced trumpet for like 4 years, I can say that that particular aphorism is not always true. But for some people, it is - especially the below artists, who shared their humble (aka "bad") beginnings and the state of their art now, after tons of practice. It's pretty incredible and inspiring, unlike my trumpet playing.



1. One year's progress, by ItsMeHoswa

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From the artist, about their practice of dedicating time to drawing every single day to improve their work:

Around 2-3 hours each day but it usually depends on the amount of school work I get, there are times when I only get to draw 30-60mins on my sketchbook



2. Two self portraits I drew from a mirror 10 years apart, aged 13 and 23 by Miles___

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On how he became better at drawing:

Consistency with drawing everyday and a solid amount of community support online. There was this awesome art forum back in 2006 called conceptart.org, it still exists actually but it was something special back then. Seeing your friends constantly improving and helping each other keep everything in perspective was amazing. I feel like I lucked out big time and discovered that community at a really good moment in my life. Otherwise I went to an 'atelier' style program instead of university and spent a lot of time drawing from life. If you're interested in the work I do outside of studies, its mostly surreal pencil stuff, best place to look is probably my Instagram @miles_art

Good luck! Drawing is fun but i get that it can be very frustrating, the most important thing is not to stop.



3. My Realism Drawing Progress over the last few years by banksied

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The artist, on epiphanies and breakthroughs:

My main epiphany was that the best thing I could do was to start observing in two dimensions. start flattening images in your head and figure out how they truly look. Disassociate any ideas about an object you have and see it as pure visual information. I don't know if I'm explaining this properly but the key is learning to observe properly.



4. Ages 2 through 25 by Marc Allante

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Prints of Marc's work can be purchased here.



5. My artistic progress through 8 years of painting digital still lifes by kietland

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The artist, on patience and improvement:

the hardest part is starting. getting in the habit of just drawing a little bit each day is all you need I think!



6. Eyes, 2001 vs. 2014, by José Vergara

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7. Spider-Man & Plastic Man, by Alex Ross

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8. 2003 vs. 2015, by Noah Bradley

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Some more examples of Noah's work:

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The artist, on advice:

If I can leave you with one piece of advice that I have acquired over all of these years, it's to always find some degree of pride in what you have accomplished so far. Be thankful for every accomplishment, no matter how small. Be proud of yourselves. Not to the point of pride, but rather to encourage and motivate.

Because if you just keep going, eventually you'll find yourself somewhere.