Better Call Saul's premiere episode, Uno, just aired - and to the surprise of absolutely no one, it was chock full of references and nods to its parent series, Breaking Bad. Here are some of the best: 

 

1. Saul Goodman's future as a Cinnabon manager in Omaha

via breakingbadfriends

As Saul Goodman and Walter White were on the run due to Walt's meth-makin' crimes coming to light, Saul mused about what the future would hold for someone like him...

via saulgoodman

Lo and behold, the black-and-white, mustachioed, and much balder future that awaited Albuquerque's sleaziest lawyer was exactly what he predicted:

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via breakingbadfriends

 

And apparently, Cinnabon is ALL ABOUT cashing in on being referenced in shows about a lawyer who ends up desperately trying to protect a meth kingpin guilty of a crazy amount of crimes.

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via Consumerist

 

 

 

 

 

2. Brief appearances from two of Breaking Bad's most memorable badasses: Mike Ehrmentraut and Tuco Salamanca

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Mike's appearance wasn't too much of a surprise - he was widely publicized as being a series regular on Better Call Saul, after all. Still, hearing that familiar (annoyed) voice left a wonderful feeling in every Breaking Bad fan's heart, and finally seeing his weathered (annoyed) face again was everything we could have hoped for. The fact that he was a parking attendant, giving poor Jimmy McGill guff about not having the requisite stickers for parking, was almost besides the point. Mike's back!

The other big cameo was much less expected - as he was known to do in Breaking Bad, Tuco Salamanca showed up at the end of the episode and left a feeling of total dread in every viewer's stomach. Jimmy's plan to worm his way into a county treasurer embezzlement case went way south when his skater-involving scheme brought him to the home of Tuco Salamanca's abuela.

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via breakingbadfriends

Quick note to everyone who's ever in or around Albuquerque - DO NOT MESS WITH THE SALAMANCAS. EVER.

 

 

3. The origins of Tuco's signature catchphrase

via vanityfair

This remains pure speculation at this point - but the two doofy skaters in league with Saul (who are also currently captured in the Salamanca household) ALSO previously used the phrase "Tight tight tight" - which will eventually become Tuco's go-to line. Of course, they weren't referencing the dopest crystal in all the Southwest.

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via funnels

And if Tuco taking their line is anything like Breaking Bad's method for Walt stealing other peoples' phrasing and behavior, things aren't looking good for these subpar Slippin' Jimmies.

 

4. Jimmy's nail salon office sounds awful familiar...

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via theryandibiase

Jimmy McGill's sad, dank office sits in the back of a nail salon (that won't even let him have a sip of its cucumber water). But where have we heard Saul Goodman referencing nail salons before? Ah right - the nail salon was one of Saul's ideas for how Jesse could launder his meth money millions.

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5. The abundance of parallels to Breaking Bad

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Like Walter White, Jimmy McGill is on the path to monetary success with the help of an alter-ego. For Walt, it was Heisenberg. For Jimmy, it's Saul Goodman. Walt drove a shitty car (the infamous Aztec), Jimmy drives a shitty car (a Suzuki Esteem so beat up, that it would only be worth $500 if there were a $300 hooker in the back).

Both enlist the help of representatives of Albuquerque's slacker community to assist them on their path to criminal success - although Walt's partnership with Jesse Pinkman was at least a little more worthwhile than Jimmy's partnership with the conmen skaters.

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And - probably most importantly - like Walter White, Jimmy McGill begins the series with a flashforward to a grim moment - for Breaking Bad, it was relatively near in the future, and its protagonist was pantsless, confused, and ready to die. For Better Call Saul, it was far, far in the future, and Jimmy McGill - now with an identity beyond even Saul Goodman - was a man on the run, stuck running an Omaha Cinnabon and always looking over his shoulder for the inevitable danger that he fears has followed him.

And - somewhat ironically - the journey from Walter White's beginning to Saul Goodman's end has left Saul taking the place of Walt in many ways: he now has the glasses, the sad mustache, and the menial job that defined Walt at his lowest point. But while Walt was struggling to escape his sadsack lot in life, it's Saul's unalterable destiny (even if he doesn't know it yet). Breaking Bad was about a man trying to become something more than what he was. Better Call Saul is about a man doomed to become even less.

 


 

Want more hidden stuff courtesy of Vince Gilligan and crew? Check out 10 Breaking Bad Easter Eggs You Missed the First Time.