6. Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde are based on one huge tool

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Growing up in Edinburgh, Scotland, Robert Louis Stevenson heard tales of the gentleman bastard William Deacon Brodie. As the legend goes, Brodie was an angelic pillar of the community during the daylight hours, but when night fell he became a thieving prick. He was like a werewolf, only every full night was a full moon, and instead of transforming into a horrific beast he would just be more likely to B & E. His double-life doesn't stop there -- Brodie used the money from his burglaries to support two secret mistresses and the five children between them, leading two or more lives. Eventually he was caught and sentenced to die, but rumors persisted that he managed to fake his death and shed his facade once and for all. Stevenson was inspired by Brodie's conflicting identities and drew up his famous novel, which as we all know culminated in the opening scene of Van Helsing in which Hugh Jackman fought a CGI Hyde that kind of looked like Shrek.

 

7. Bond. James "Forest Yeo-Thomas" Bond

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Though Ian Fleming had many inspirations for his most famous character -- like how the name "James Bond" came from a dashing rogue in the exciting field of bird study -- one man in particular seems like a likely basis for the bulk of 007. Forest Yeo-Thomas was an operative who performed several missions in World War II, at times reporting to Winston Churchill himself. Though Fleming worked in Naval Intelligence, documents show that he was stalking Yeo-Thomas' exploits in the Special Operations Executive. That torture scene in Casino Royale? It's pretty close to what the Gestapo did to Yeo-Thomas during interrogation.The bit with secret identities meeting on a train in From Russia with Love? Another Yeo-Thomas mission. They say that Yeo-Thomas even had a way with the ladies as well, though hopefully not to the scale of the human STD petri dish known as James Bond.

 

8. The basis for Alice in Wonderland will take you down a disturbing rabbit hole

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Though Lewis Carroll later denied it, the Alice of Wonderland is clearly based on one Alice Liddell. Not only was Carroll known for weaving fanciful tales to impress a 7-year-old Liddell, but you could even find her name hidden inside a poem at the end of Through the Looking Glass. Maybe he didn't want to perpetuate the idea that his relationship with Alice was on the skeevy side -- even though it totally was. While nothing was ever confirmed, the Liddell parents cut off all communication with Carroll at one point, and many suspect it was because the author was getting a little too cozy with his muse. We will now break for a five-minute recess so everyone can rinse their brains with battery acid.