4. The Incredibles is basically Atlas Shrugged

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If a movie attains a certain level of regard, most any group will try to adopt it as their own and swear it supports their position -- that's why crackpots claim The Dark Knight is a love letter to George W. Bush. But in the case of Pixar's The Incredibles, the social and political implications of the plot are hard to ignore. As more than one writer has pointed out, the themes have a lot in common with the work of Ayn Rand, queen of Objectivism; maybe you played her life story in the video game BioShock. You can see some Rand-inspired imagery in The Incredibles, as Mr. Incredible mimics the Atlas of Atlas Shrugged:

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That might seem arbitrary, but it jibes with the rest of the movie. At the beginning, we see that Mr. Incredible's talents are being squandered in his boring office job. Mr. Incredible's son, Dash, is forced to quench his super speed as to not annihilate his classmates during track practice.
This talented family has to suppress their excellence to fit in with "the normals," which is exactly the kind of thing Rand abhors. The villain Syndrome wants to even the playing field by giving everyone the technology to be whatever they want to be -- "When everyone is super, no one will be," he says, just before you remember Jason Lee is a Scientologist and get a little bit sad. For most of the movie, the Incredibles family are battling to keep their "specialhood," whereas the bad guy's goal is to make the whole world "special." That's kind of the epitome of Objectivism: The emphasis on rewarding the achievers as opposed to propping up the mediocre masses.

Of course, the big difference is that The Incredibles use their power to help the weak, and the powerful people in Atlas Shrugged end up saying "Fuck y'all" and going off to create their own mountain Rapture. To-may-toes, to-mah-toes.