1. Just the worst villains

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Part of the reason Batman is so enduring is that he's got, bar-none, the best rogues gallery in comics. The likes of The Joker, Penguin, Poison Ivy are so iconic that they made an entire show based around Batman Villains: Origins. But for every Bane or Two-Face, there are a dozen dopey goons that fall through the cracks.

Like a bad, gigantic penny standing on its side in the Batcave, these obscure weirdos always manage to turn up again and again. The guy above, for instance, named himself Killer Moth. As in, a fatal version of those dusty butterflies that cause mild discomfort when they flutter around a lamp. The concept was already questionable, but then he had to go and spraypaint Ant-Man's helmet to match the "clown burial suit" motif he already had going on. At one point, DC went full-on Man-Bat and morphed Killer Moth into Charaxes, an carnivorous human-sized moth. Charaxes actually laid eggs which hatched into clones, one of which is thought to be the Bat-wannabe in the black suit. The abject failure of Killer Moth isn't just an aberration -- this happens all the time.

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The Condiment King, like Harley Quinn, originated from the sacred text known as Batman: The Animated Series. He and his condiment-based puns were used to help Batman to ketchup with his Adam Westy roots. It was amusing to see him show up in the comics, but only the one time; repeating the same cheesy joke over and over doesn't do Batman's integrity any flavors.

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Created in 1946, Crazy Quilt is older than most superheroes. Like the one-note blockheads Killer Moth and Condiment King, you'd think that Crazy Quilt would also fade into obscurity, but somehow he always returns. CQ's gimmick is manipulating light so it confuses and otherwise bedazzles his enemies -- it's not like he brings out anything new in Batman or offers anything more than the butt of an oft-repeated joke. But DC has ran with it to the point of creating an official Rule 63 Crazy Quilt. Seriously.

If we're being honest, this is probably on the fans who love these kooky characters. Hell, current Batman writer Scott Snyder said that he wrote Crazy Quilt into a story specifically because of fan demand. Batman has to waste his time fighting bugs, hot dog toppings and Jo-Ann Fabric assistant managers -- and it's all your fault.