5. The Adventures of Batman and Robin

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<p>Every Batman videogame has the opportunity to turn the Caped Crusader's mix of crimefighting, detective work, and vigilante psychosis into hours of fun. The recent Arkham Asylum/Arkham City games nailed the darkest iteration of the Batman character, but the Super <span class=NES adaptation of The Adventures of Batman and Robin (previously titled Batman: The Animated Series) does something harder. It makes great gameplay out of that TV show's more old-fashioned Bruce Wayne, who wears an Adam West-toned costume and kicks the crap out of rogues' gallery types like The Penguin and The Riddler. Think about every dumb thing the Joel Schumacher movies did, and be glad that there was not only a better '90s Batman in TV cartoons, but that all the cartoons' best aspects made it into a solid videogame.

4. DuckTales

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<p>Capcom didn't just make a classic <span class=NES version of your favorite late-80s TV show. They also proved that videogames didn't have you put you in the shoes of a young, heroic, physically-fit person to be fun - elderly, plutocrat ducks who have difficulty walking are just as good. DuckTales also makes doing your attack move (pogo-bouncing on Scrooge McDuck's walking stick) more fun and more effective than moving through the game the regular way and it's such a blast that Deus Ex creator Warren Spector told an interviewer at PAX 2012 that "he'd like to make a new game where "a duck can be Indiana Jones""://www.nintendolife.com/news/2012/09/warren_spector_wants_to_make_a_ducktales_game, in keeping with the NES platformer's bounce-from-Transylvania-to-the-Amazon-to-the-Moon charms.

3. Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles II: The Arcade Game

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<p>The A New Hope of button-mashing (because its sequel Turtles In Time was the Empire Strikes Back of button-mashing), <span class=TMNT II: The Arcade Game is why a generation of cartoon fans have a very specific preference for which Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtle was the best team member. Where DuckTales made Scrooge McDuck's life into a whimsical platform-bounce adventure, this game let you beat up wave after wave of Shredder's Foot Soldiers. Sure, if you were playing the arcade version, that meant pumping a lot of coins in, but playing at home meant you could work your way up to beating fly-man Baxter Stockman and saving April no matter how long it took. This game also gave you positive reasons to be frustrated with your gamer friends ("Why are you dragging us down on our noble mission?") instead of the negative ones associated with multiplayer action in most shooters ("Why aren't you stiff enough competition for my murder spree?"), so there's something to be said for that.

2. Adventure Time: Hey Ice King! Why'd You Steal Our Garbage?

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<p>Adventure Time is a sandbox of playful-yet-thoughtful ideas, explored through episode-length quests like LIVE. "I want to kick ass with joysticks and never feel a feeling!" Well you're in luck, Emotional Troglodyte. Adventure Time may not suit your TV-watching habits (which are nothing but 24 reruns with fast-forwarded dialogue), but it should suit your creative gameplay habits. There's Jake the shapeshifting dog's Wiggly Arm Attack and ability to make himself a bridge, you can fight with ice ninja weapons and glowing swords, and it's the most fun tag-team platform duo since DK and Diddy in Donkey Kong Country.

1. The Simpsons: Hit And Run

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<p>Actual Simpsons writers and voice cast members gave an extra layer of straight-from-TV charm to this Grand Theft Auto-style romp through Springfield. The storyline is a fun crisis where Kang and Kodos mind-control Springfield through sugary soda, the load screens have Springfield Shopper newspaper headlines (STUDY: 90% OF VIDEO GAMES START WITH EASY TUTORIAL LEVEL"), and your borderline-negligent reckless driving makes plenty of story sense since it's Homer Simpson behind the wheel. In a lot of ways this googly-eyed sandbox videogame, released in 2003 for several gaming platforms and for PC, is the medium where The Simpsons stayed relevant as its TV source material slid into mediocrity.

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